While playing a first-person shooter I came to an impasse. My squad faced an enormous amount of soldiers over a ridge and odds were against us getting out alive.

I ended up using a guided missile system or as the character in the game put it, “white phosphorus munitions” to take out our foes.

The end result looked great at that moment. My enemies were decimated by my attack and my squad walked away completely unscathed.

Or so I thought.

Turns out, our enemy was escorting civilians to safety and along with killing all the enemy soldiers, I’d also inadvertently killed all the civilians as well.

One of the most jaw-dropping moments in all my years of playing video games. To see all the dead men, women, and children and think, “what a horrible thing I’ve done.”

It was the definition of good intentions paving the way to hell and captured the horrors of war in a way most video games would never want to impart.

The rest of the story is about the fallout. How my character and squad begin to lose their minds and ultimately no longer see fact from fiction and in the game’s finale you realize that the character you played hallucinated ninety percent of what had happened in the game.

It’s an audacious story that struggles a lot of the time, but when the game is strong really knocks it out of the park.

Can are our lies become a life of their own? In order for my character to cope, he had to blame a man and circumstances, many of which were in his head to keep himself going.

Though his situation was pretty unique. He was fighting through a warzone with survival being the only real priority, making his lie perhaps more important. It was keeping him focused and alive.

In life, we don’t always live in warzones or places where one aspect of our lives can dominate all else. Maybe that makes lies easier. We juggle so much in our lives.

Family, friends, work, bills, etc. things that could make lying insidiously more attractive and give us the allure of an easier way out.

Because even on our best days, life can demand a lot of us.

I don’t know the answer for reality but in the world of Arcane, it could be a fun idea to explore.

A person so distraught or overwhelmed by their choices or the world around them that they have to cope in the most fantastical way possible Creating a lie with just enough truth that it takes on a life of its own.

Can A Lie Become Reality?

While playing a first-person shooter I came to an impasse. My squad faced an enormous amount of soldiers over a ridge and odds were against us getting out alive.   I ended up using a guided missile system or as the character in the game put it, “white phosphorus munitions” to take out our foes.   The end result looked great at that moment. My enemies were decimated by my attack and my squad walked away completely unscathed.   Or so I thought.   Turns out, our enemy was escorting civilians to safety and along with killing all the enemy soldiers, I’d also inadvertently killed all the civilians as well.   One of the most jaw-dropping moments in all my years of playing video games. To see all the dead men, women, and children and think, “what a horrible thing I’ve done.”   It was the definition of good intentions paving the way to hell and captured the horrors of war in a way most video games would never want to impart.   The rest of the story is about the fallout. How my character and squad begin to lose their minds and ultimately no longer see fact from fiction and in the game’s finale you realize that the character you played hallucinated ninety percent of what had happened in the game.   It’s an audacious story that struggles a lot of the time, but when the game is strong really knocks it out of the park.   Can are our lies become a life of their own? In order for my character to cope, he had to blame a man and circumstances, many of which were in his head to keep himself going.   Though his situation was pretty unique. He was fighting through a warzone with survival being the only real priority, making his lie perhaps more important. It was keeping him focused and alive.   In life, we don’t always live in warzones or places where one aspect of our lives can dominate all else. Maybe that makes lies easier. We juggle so much in our lives.   Family, friends, work, bills, etc. things that could make lying insidiously more attractive and give us the allure of an easier way out.   Because even on our best days, life can demand a lot of us.   I don’t know the answer for reality but in the world of Arcane, it could be a fun idea to explore.   A person so distraught or overwhelmed by their choices or the world around them that they have to cope in the most fantastical way possible Creating a lie with just enough truth that it takes on a life of its own.

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